President Bush addressed the annual conference of the National Association of Evangelicals yesterday, touting his record on issues close to the hearts of attendees.

I have been proud to sign the Born-Alive Infants Protection Act and legislation supporting maternity group homes. I strongly support the Unborn Victims of Violence Act, and call upon the United States Congress to send it to my desk. I oppose the use of federal funds for the destruction of human embryos for stem cell research. I will work with Congress to pass a comprehensive and effective ban on human cloning.

The President also praised the work of faith-based social services, committing his administration to "rallying the armies of compassion in America." He said, "All of you know the power of faith to transform lives, you're answering the call to love and to serve your neighbor. Our laws should welcome and encourage your good works. We should never discriminate against faith-based charities."

Bush's emphasized his faith-informed "doctrine" to rid the globe of terror, fight AIDS in Africa, and spread democracy and freedom. "I'm fortunate enough to be President during a time in which our country holds great influence in the world, and I feel that we must use that influence for great purpose. When we see disease, and starvation, and hopeless poverty, we must not turn away."

More pressing to the President are domestic issues, as the presidential election nears. Bush promised to fight judicial challenges to the partial-birth abortion ban and assaults on marriage and highlighted his appointment of judges who will not "legislate from the bench." The President also promised to "defend the sanctity of marriage." Conservatives have been criticizing "judicial activism" that ...

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Launched in 1999, Christianity Today’s Weblog was not just one of the first religion-oriented weblogs, but one of the first published by a media organization. (Hence its rather bland title.) Mostly compiled by then-online editor Ted Olsen, Weblog rounded up religion news and opinion pieces from publications around the world. As Christianity Today’s website grew, it launched other blogs. Olsen took on management responsibilities, and the Weblog feature as such was mothballed. But CT’s efforts to round up important news and opinion from around the web continues, especially on our Gleanings feature.
Ted Olsen
Ted Olsen is Christianity Today's editorial director. He wrote the magazine's Weblog—a collection of news and opinion articles from mainstream news sources around the world—from 1999 to 2006. In 2004, the magazine launched Weblog in Print, which looks for unexpected connections and trends in articles appearing in the mainstream press. The column was later renamed "Tidings" and ran until 2007.
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