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A THEOLOGY OF WORD AND SPIRIT

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HOLY SCRIPTURE

By Donald G. Bloesch

WHEN GOD DOESN’T MAKE SENSE

By James Dobson

TWO KINGDOMS

By Robert Clouse, Richard Pierard, and Edwin Yamauchi

OUT OF MY MIND: THE BEST OF JOE BAYLY

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Gay, Proud, And Sadly Mistaken

STRANGER AT THE GATE,by Mel White (Simon and Schuster, 287 pp.; $23, hardcover). Reviewed by Bob Davies, executive director of Exodus International and coauthor of Coming Out of Homosexuality (InterVarsity).

Can best-selling Christian books and I award-winning evangelistic films be written and produced by a married man who, between writing projects, is committing adultery with other men? Not only could it happen—it did happen, as revealed in Mel White’s disturbing autobiography. His confessions will probably embarrass well-known evangelical leaders who used his services as a ghostwriter: Jerry Falwell (Strength for the Journey, If I Should Die Before I Wake!), Billy Graham (Approaching Hoofbeats), Pat Robertson (America’s Dates with Destiny), and W. A. Criswell (Standing on the Promises). Besides his books, White produced such films as How Should We Then Live? with the late Francis Schaeffer, and D. James Kennedy’s Like a Mighty Army.

In Stranger at the Gate, White presents himself as an evangelical case study. His goal is to show that the traditional Christian teaching on homosexuality is wrong since it did not work in his life and causes suffering in the lives of many others. White’s writing skills serve him well as he eloquently tells his story, describing the excruciating conflict between his inner homosexual desires and his outward evangelical successes.

Although aware of same-sex desires ...

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