Grand Ole Oprah


It saddens me to think Oprah Winfrey is comforting others with such sentiments as "When you lose a loved one, you gain an angel whose name you know" ["The Church of O," April 1].

She makes spirituality easy, simple, and self-motivating. What real spiritual power could be wielded if Oprah were using the Word of God to comfort others. Instead, she says, "One of the biggest mistakes we make is to believe there is only one way. There are many diverse paths leading to God."

Thanks but no thanks, Oprah, Phil, Deepak, Iyanla, Marianne, and Gary. I'll stick with Jesus' statement, "I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one can come to the Father but through me."

Maybe Oprah's next Book Club selection should be the Bible.



Thank you for not bowing to "Pope-rah" Winfrey and her brand of spirituality. I do hope this is an eye-opener for so many Christians who want to see Christ in everything that is "good."

Wholesome or positive media do not necessarily mean Christian media; yet I often hear Christians espousing the virtues of certain movies and TV programs (e.g., Oprah's Dr. Phil, Touched By an Angel, etc.) without analyzing the content for signs of the true gospel.

Use of the word God has become virtually meaningless in America. It can mean anything from inner strength to Satan himself. Oprah's spirituality, though laced with Christian terminology, is not only devoid of biblical understanding but is also a deceptive counterfeit that leads people away from salvation.



I wish LaTonya Taylor well as she indicates she "would love to do a book on Oprah," as quoted in Inside CT ["Using a Knife, Fork, and Spoon," April 1]. If that happens, it is my hope that this gifted young African American writer might understand that even ...

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