Douglas Groothuis calls his new apologetics volume, which weighs in at well over 700 pages, "as close to a magnum opus as I will ever have." Groothuis, professor of philosophy at Denver Seminary, has written a number of books about worldview, apologetics, and the gospel, including Truth Decay: Defending Christianity Against the Challenges of Postmodernism (IVP) and The Soul in Cyberspace (Wipf and Stock). His latest offering is Christian Apologetics: A Comprehensive Case for Biblical Faith (IVP Academic). Stan Guthrie, a CT editor at large and coauthor of The Sacrament of Evangelism, spoke with Groothuis about his apologetics approach.

What distinguishes this book from other apologetics books?

While there are many good apologetics books out there, it seemed that they were all missing something. For example, a book might be extremely good but not deal sufficiently with the problem of evil, or with Darwinism and intelligent design. And in general, a lot of apologetics books fail to sufficiently address other religions, particularly Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam, whose beliefs pose very significant challenges to Christianity today. So I'm not claiming that I necessarily do a better job than some of the great apologists out there, such as J. P. Moreland and William Lane Craig. But I tried to put everything germane to the apologetics agenda in one book.

How do you approach apologetics in the current culture?

I think our culture is very pluralistic in a lot of ways. Different pockets of the culture have different perspectives on truth, knowledge, worldviews, and so on. The savvy apologist needs to understand the basic worldviews and epistemologies, and then get a good read on the approaches taken by individual ...

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