Last year, we saw a resurgence in interest in personality types. Headlines and studies declared the benefits of being an extrovert, an introvert, an introvert who acts like an extrovert, or even an ambivert (a healthy mix of both).

We seem to always want to know what it takes to get to the top. Is it the strong, silent type? What about the assertive, outgoing one? Like siblings who are always trying to outdo the other, introverts and extroverts often find themselves at opposite ends of the playing field, each thinking they've got the upper hand.

Secular and church cultures share a fascination with personality types. As a resident assistant at a Christian college, I was asked to complete the Myers-Briggs assessment, used to better understand how the staff led and served those under our care in the dorms. Churches and ministries regularly take advantage of personality tests to better gauge their leaders, staff, and congregants.

I am an extrovert, a social butterfly since I uttered my first word. I have never met a stranger and can strike up a conversation with just about anyone. I love being around people, and I hate being alone. You know how some people get anxious when they walk into a crowded room? I am the complete opposite. Silence and solitude terrifies me.

I'm such an extrovert that this recent list on Buzzfeed really resonated with me. I found myself nodding yes to nearly every caption and GIF. Friends to talk it out? Yes, definitely. No plans on a weekend? Shudder. Bored alone? Nailed it.

I also know and love many introverts. I am one of four siblings, and they're not all extroverts like me. I've learned as I've gotten older that each personality is a beautiful depiction of the handiwork ...

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