I'm my dad's spitting image. My fair skin, strawberry blond hair, analytical mind, and impatience with all things not just-so come straight from him. Anyone who knows me and knows him knows that I am my father's daughter. The fact that I am made in his image does not get diminished at all because I am female.

The same is true for being made in God's image. Women and men equally are made in God's image, a characteristic and identity that's not tied to our sex: "Male and female he made them," all of us, in his image.

Being made in God's image entails far more significant qualities than our sex.

Being made in God's image means, among other things, that we are moral beings, able to have consciousness of right and wrong, good and evil. It means we share a vocation as vice-regents in the stewardship of his creation. It means that we are eternal, created to live forever. We are creative like our Creator, co-creators in multiplying his image-bearers. Like God, we love and hate and anger and hurt in ways that can't be explained merely by firing neurons and surging chemicals. We have language, and that language shapes us as we shape the world through our words. It means we can recognize and appreciate beauty. We long.

None of these characteristics of God, reflected in the creatures that bear his image, are confined to one sex or the other. I am no less made in my earthly father's image in being female than I am in being made in my heavenly Father's image.

Yet some purport that in order for us to understand the fullness of woman being created in God's image, it's helpful to refer to God "herself." Of course, the call for gender-neutral language has ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Posted: