"There is a need for the light of the gospel to permeate the arts community, … to reverse the tide of a poisonous, self-destructive attitude," says Douglas Yeo, bass trombonist for the Boston Symphony Orchestra. "The problem really is spiritual, an unwillingness to fulfill the role that we have clearly defined for us in the symphony orchestra."

Audiences would be amazed at the attitudes among symphony members, Yeo thinks.

Christian musicians as role models

When one thinks of unreached people groups, classical musicians aren't likely to spring to mind. But hundreds of musicians are aiming to reach the world of classical music with a Christian witness. Yeo openly shares the gospel and his views on the brutal competition in classical music, employing his Web site (yeodoug.com) as a forum.

He believes Christian musicians can be role models, pointing to Paul's description of the body with each member having its part. His part is third trombone, and he is content with it—an attitude apparently rare in the competitive world of classical music.

John Kasica, percussionist with the St. Louis Symphony, says he applies Christ's servant philosophy to his fellow professionals. "If you serve your colleagues and give them the first opportunity to have the best part, and encourage them and help them sound better rather than compete with them—let them be the best—you reap what you sow. God will position you to do the best work. Now that takes a lot of faith in God—to die to your own talent—but that's what it takes."

"With the arts, you have an opportunity to bring the gospel to people in creative ways. We don't always have to use words." notes Kasica's wife, Paula, a professional flautist.

The desire to communicate ...

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