New Top Anglican Receives Mixed Reviews

"Appointee is against abortion, for gay ordination, and not from the Third World"
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Conservatives in the worldwide 70 million-member Anglican Communion are cautiously greeting the selection of Rowan Williams as the 104th Archbishop of Canterbury. Williams will succeed retiring George Carey, an evangelical, next month. Prime Minister Tony Blair chose him in July.

Married and the father of two school-age children, Williams, 52, supports the ordination of homosexuals and women and opposes abortion. He has also spoken out against the United States-led war on terrorism and against the commercial exploitation of children. A Welshman, Williams is the first Archbishop of Canterbury from outside the Church of England since the 16th century.

"If there's one thing I long for above all else, it's that the years to come may see Christianity in this country able again to capture the imagination of our culture, to draw the strongest energies of our thinking and feeling," Williams said.

John Smith, U.K. director of the Evangelical Alliance, called the appointment "significant and imaginative." Smith praised Carey, who is stepping down after 11 years, for upholding key doctrines such as the resurrection and the uniqueness of Christ, "as well as the moral imperatives of the Christian faith … on human sexuality and family life."

Smith added: "We hope and pray the new Archbishop will work hard to sustain these important traditions."

The Anglican Mission in America is a conservative movement resisting liberal dominance in the Episcopal Church. "Williams is clearly brilliant and largely orthodox, based on his writings concerning the cardinal doctrines and teachings of the church," Jay Greener of AMIA told Christianity Today. "However, he seems to be less clear and orthodox on social and moral issues that affect us today, and seems ...

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