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100+ Dead After Anti-Muslim Riots

Plus: South Dakota's expansive anti-abortion bill, mandatory abortions proposed in Netherlands, WCC head attacks megachurches, and other stories from online sources around the world.

Today's Top Five

1. Nigeria holds its breath: Are riots over?
Onitsha is calm after two days of anti-Muslim riots, say press reports, but all is not well in the southern Nigerian city. "Mobs stopped killing and looting in this battered Nigerian city Thursday and turned to disposing of the evidence in the crudest of ways," reports The Washington Post. "With smoldering bonfires fueled by pieces of wood and old tires, men burned the remains of their Muslim victims on downtown streets, leaving behind charred legs, skulls, and shoulders that motorists swerved to avoid." Both the Post and the Associated Press quote Ifeanyi Ese (Eze), who was found writing on one of the destroyed mosques, "Muhammad is a man, but Jesus is from above."

"We don't want these mosques here anymore," he told the reporters. "These people are causing all the problems all over the world because they don't fear God. We don't want Muhammad anymore."

Reuters quotes another resident saying, "We are very happy that this thing is happening so that the north will learn their lesson."

The concern now is that Muslims in northern Nigeria will retaliate for the retaliatory attacks, which reportedly killed twice as many people as the attacks against Christians in Maiduguri and elsewhere earlier in the week.

2. South Dakota's abortion ban returns In 2004, South Dakota Governor Mike Rounds vetoed a bill banning almost all abortions in the state, saying he was worried that existing abortion restrictions would be eliminated during the certain court fight. Now a very similar bill has returned to his desk. If Rounds signs it this time, it would be a clear opportunity for the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade. Indeed, that's pretty much the point of the bill. But there ...

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Ted Olsen is Christianity Today's managing editor for news and online journalism. He wrote the magazine's Weblog—a collection of news and opinion articles from mainstream news sources around the world—from 1999 to 2006. In 2004, the magazine launched Weblog in Print, which looks for unexpected connections and trends in articles appearing in the mainstream press. The column was later renamed "Tidings" and ran until 2007.
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