“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” Though a 2012 First Amendment Center survey noted that a majority of Americans identify that the First Amendment contains the freedom of speech, only about a quarter remembered its provision for freedom of religion. Simultaneously protecting religious freedom in America and complicating church-state relations, the right to religious freedom grounds debates over a range of issues, from religion in public schools to corporate expressions of free exercise.

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Religious Freedom Isn’t Just for Christians
Religious Freedom Isn’t Just for ChristiansSubscriber Access Only
A Supreme Court cruelty reveals how we can love our neighbors.
For Black Evangelicals, How Does Masterpiece Cakeshop Compare to Jim Crow?
For Black Evangelicals, How Does Masterpiece Cakeshop Compare to Jim Crow?
Four views on why African American Christians have mixed feelings about the Supreme Court’s first ruling on refusing services for same-sex weddings.
Unions Survive Supreme Court Challenge from Christian Teachers
Unions Survive Supreme Court Challenge from Christian TeachersSubscriber Access Only
Fight for freedom of association could have eliminated collective bargaining.
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