Hindu Leaders Crack Down on Conversions

Potential converts must ask permission
2003This article is part of CT's digital archives. Subscribers have access to all current and past issues, dating back to 1956.

India's ruling right-wing Hindu Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) is about to introduce a national law that will effectively prevent religious conversions among the Dalits. Increasing numbers of India's 250 million Dalits, formerly known as untouchables, have been converting to Buddhism and Christianity.

In September the BJP-controlled National Commission for Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes introduced the rule without seeking approval from the Indian Parliament. The rule is modeled after similar legislation in Tamil Nadu, Orissa, and Gujarat states. It will become law when officially published.

The rule requires that anyone wishing to change religion receive written permission from a local official.

"This rule is not against conversion. We are just trying to regulate forcible conversion," said Bizay Sonkar Shastri, commission chairman.

In India, 350 million people are illiterate. About 260 million fall below the poverty line. The rule also requires that aspiring converts have a secondary education.

"This will effectively deny a large section of Indians their right to religious faith ensured by India's Constitution," said Oliver D'Souza of the All India Christian Council.

Meanwhile, India's Supreme Court on September 1 ruled that there is "no fundamental right to convert" someone from one religion to another. The court said the government may restrict conversions.


Related Elsewhere



Christianity Today has many other articles on conversion bans in India:

Fending off Hindutva | Christians blast Nazi-like survey, 'draconian' conversion law. (May 16, 2003)
Gujarat Religious Survey Troubles Indian Christians | Government of Indian state says it has been gathering statistics on the minority at the behest of federal officials. (March 14, ...
Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

September
Subscribe to CT and get one year free.
More from this IssueRead This Issue
Read These Next
close