The President's Council on Bioethics recommended a complete ban on human cloning for reproduction but, in a 10-7 split, only a four-year moratorium on cloning for research purposes. Conservatives are disappointed by the July decision.

"The recommended moratorium is only a stopgap measure and does not guarantee that human embryos created by cloning will be protected," said Carrie Gordon Earll, bioethics analyst for Focus on the Family.

"It is regrettable that the council could not support the view that human cloning involves the creation and destruction of innocent human life," says Ken Connor, president of the Family Research Council.

Bioethicist Nigel M. de S. Cameron of the Wilberforce Forum takes a more optimistic view. He told Christianity Today that the report establishes the panel's credibility as not being a tool of the political right.

"The glass is certainly half full," Cameron said.

"I'm very positive about the report, and hope that Congress moves immediately at least to pass a four-year moratorium on both forms of cloning."

In January President Bush named 18 members from various fields to the advisory panel. A White House statement calls on the Senate to "take action this year to ban all human cloning." The House passed a complete ban last year.


Related Elsewhere



The council on bioethics' full report, including an 11-page executive summary, is available at the council's website.)

News coverage includes:

Cloning edict angers both sidesSan Francisco Chronicle (July 12, 2002)
Temporary ban advised for cloning of humansThe Washington Times (July 12, 2002)
Bush panel has 2 views on embryonic cloningThe Washington Post (July 11, 2002)
Panel recommends a moratorium on cloning research—The New York Times (July 10, 2001)

A White ...

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