Forget the 200 Barrier - Small Churches Need to Break the Grasshopper Barrier
The only problem with smallness is when we think being small is a problem

The 200 Barrier needs to be retired.

We have to erase it from our church leadership lexicon before it does any more harm to good churches and their pastors.

Yes, there is a difference in the way churches behave administratively under and over 200 (give or take 50). It would be foolish not to acknowledge and teach that reality. But it's time to stop referring to 200 as a barrier.

Calling it The 200 Barrier carries some dangerous implications – starting with the implication that a church over 200 is better than a church under 200.

What evidence is there, either biblical or analytical, that churches over 200 have greater value than churches under 200?

What evidence is there, either biblical or analytical, that churches over 200 have greater value than churches under 200? Do they automatically have a greater impact on their community because of their size? Are they better at discipleship? Evangelism? Worship? No, no, no and no.

Sure, larger churches do some things better than smaller ones. But small churches can do other things better than bigger ones.

Instead, we need to help pastors and churches break through the Grasshopper Barrier.

What is The Grasshopper Barrier?

The Grasshopper Barrier is the emotional/spiritual wall that causes us to keep believing The Grasshopper Myth.

The Grasshopper Barrier is a toxic mindset that keeps churches and pastors from recognizing The Grasshopper Myth for the lie that it is.

It holds small churches and their pastors hostage to the debilitating poison that they are less than merely because their church is smaller than. And it stops many of them from enjoying and releasing the blessings of being a healthy and healthful small church.

What's Wrong With Breaking Through the 200 Barrier?

Of course there's nothing wrong with a church growing bigger than 200. Or 2,000. Or 20,000. In fact, there's a whole lot that's right with it. We should always strive for and celebrate church growth.

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June 09, 2015 at 6:26 AM

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