Church Leadership
11 Self-Care Steps For Leaders Who Are Barely Holding On
Motivation is hard. And comfort food feels so good. But it’s more important now than ever to stay healthy.

“This feels scary, but greater is he who is in us than he who is in the world.”

4. Lean on others

Pastors do too much alone.

This has to change. And there’s no better time than now to start making that change.

Now, more than ever, people understand their – and your – limitations.

Not only is it okay to ask friends, family and church members to help out, it’s essential.

5. Invest in personal relationships

There’s a big emphasis on technology right now. Understandably so.

But the more we have to go virtual, the more valuable the personal touch will be. Even if that touch can’t be physical, it matters more than ever that it’s personal.

Regular “how are you doing?” phone calls are more important than ever. The “how can I help?” text is vital. And the follow-up with a box of groceries or an extended time to talk, pray and cry is essential.

6. Stay physically active

This is one I’m not doing as well as I should. In California, we’ve been in lockdown for over a month. In that amount of time, I should have accelerated the weight-loss regimen I was on, but it’s gone into reverse.

This is not good. Not for my body, my emotions or my spirit.

I understand why it’s happening. Motivation is hard. And comfort food feels so good.

But it’s more important now than ever to stay healthy.

7. Get plenty of rest

As I mentioned earlier, my sleep patterns are off.

So, I’m embracing the daily nap.

If you can’t sleep through the night, take a nap. If you can’t nap, close your eyes and rest. We’re all going through trauma right now. Trauma demands rest.

8. Practice spiritual disciplines outside of sermon prep

Pray.

Read the scriptures.

Ponder.

Not to get sermon material. To stay connected to Jesus.

9. Seek professional help

In severe situations, you may need to get outside assistance.

Reach out to a mentor, a coach, a financial consultant, a therapist, or someone else who has more training than you do.

It’s not weakness to ask for help. It’s weakness and foolishness – usually based in pride – not to use it when you need it.

It’s not weakness to ask for help. It’s weakness and foolishness – usually based in pride – not to use it when you need it.

10. Write it all down

There is no better way to find clarity in the middle of confusion than to write down what you’re thinking, feeling and wondering about.

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April 09, 2020 at 1:00 AM

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